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Archive of posts filed under the House and Senate Legal Counsel category.

Would the House’s Sovereign Immunity Position Bar its Suit against the President?

This is a question that should have, but didn’t, occur to me even as I sat through a good portion of yesterday’s House Rules Committee hearing, in which members and witnesses spent five hours arguing over when, if ever, it was permissible for one branch of the government to sue another. Professor Walter Dellinger testified [...]

The House All In on Sovereign Immunity

The House Ways & Means Committee has filed its response to the SEC’s enforcement action (see here and here). The House’s brief sheds some, though not much, light on its argument that the doctrine of sovereign immunity bars the subpoenas in question. The House relies primarily on a Second Circuit case, In re SEC ex [...]

The House’s Sovereign Immunity Objection to the SEC Subpoenas

As discussed in my last post, the SEC is suing the House Committee on Ways & Means and Brian Sutter, a committee staffer, to enforce two administrative subpoenas, one to the committee seeking documents and one to Sutter seeking both documents and testimony. A May 19 letter from the House General Counsel lays out 11 [...]

What Senate Legal Counsel’s Silence Says About Noel Canning: Not Much

Writing in Slate last week, Professor Neal Devins, a noted expert on the Constitution and Congress, had several complaints about how Congress presents its legal positions in court. Devins is unhappy that the House, because it operates on a majoritarian basis, may present legal views that are held only by the majority, but he is [...]

House Counsel and the Congressional “Client”

At the June 28 meeting of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, a question arose about the role of House Counsel in providing legal advice to COGR and its members. Chairman Issa had requested and received a House Counsel opinion on whether Lois Lerner waived her Fifth Amendment privilege by making an exculpatory [...]