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Archive of posts filed under the Origination Clause category.

Seth Barrett Tillman on the Relationship Between the Origination Clause and Recess Appointment Clause Cases

Professor Tillman sends the following thoughts: I expect one or more, if not all of the Supreme Court’s four liberal members to affirm the DC Circuit’s decision in Noel Canning. The primary issue in Noel Canning is not whether or not the Senate was in recess – but who or what institution gets to decide [...]

Tillman on the Origination Clause

Seth Barrett Tillman sends the following comments on the Origination Clause: The Constitution provides: All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills. U.S. Const. Art. 1, Sect. 7, Cl. 1. If the House sends a non-revenue bill to [...]

The Origination Clause and the Fiscal Cliff (updated)

Since the discussion of the issue has been rather muted, it may be worth flagging the potential impact of the Origination Clause, art. I, sect. 7, cl. 1, on how the so-called “fiscal cliff” is resolved. The Origination Clause provides that “[a]ll Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the [...]

And Now For Something Completely Different

This is not a post about Monty Python (sorry), but a couple of thoughts on the word “amendment.” Over at The Originalism Blog, Professor Michael Ramsey discusses a debate regarding the meaning of the Origination Clause of the Constitution, which provides “All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives, but the [...]